The Call

Today’s cool cool blog post is a throwback to the writer’s conference I attended all those months ago. But I still have more information to share! Next week should be the last of the conference posts, but please let me know if you have anything else in particular you’d like to hear about. Until then, have some more brain-conglomeration from Laurie McLean, Andy Kifer, and Danielle Smith. They’re fantastic!

Once Upon a Time... communication one hundred years ago. An early telephoneThis will happen some day. I will be sitting in my kitchen baking something unnecessarily complicated. My mysteriously sticky flip phone will ring and I’ll wipe my hands on my apron and answer.

It will be a literary agent. A literary agent ready to talk representation.

My heart will implode in my chest, all the blood will drain from my skull, my knees will wobble, and my youngest child will start screaming. By the time I hang up, my baking adventure will be hopelessly ruined.

But all will not be lost, for I have prepared myself for that very moment. In between the screaming child and the destroyed foodstuff, I will run to my desk for this very thing: my list of questions to ask an agent during The Call. (I kid you not. The following exactly sits on my desktop.)

Take a breath. Chit chat. Be yo’ cool self. And then…

Definitely ask:

What was it about my book that made you want to work with me?

Are there any areas in the story that you think need to be reworked? How extensive do you think edits will be?

Are you interested in working with me on only this project, or on all future projects? How long does agency representation last? Is there an agency agreement, and may I read it beforehand?

How frequently do you communicate with clients? What’s your preferred style? (Phone? Email? Smoke signals?)

Maybe ask:

What do you charge for what? (15% of any deals? Subsidiary rights licenses? Out of pocket expenses?)

What happens if you leave the agency (death, disability, retirement, moves on to different agency, etc.)?

As an agent, what do you consider your strong suit? (Pitching, editing, negotiating, etc)

(Okay, not a question) Here are some ideas I have on promotional/marketing plans for this particular project.

What happens if we don’t sell this book?

Don’t ask:

Can you tell me about your list? (Anything about their list of sales and their other clients is probably online. In fact, you should probably have already looked at it when you were doing your research. Asking this will make it look like you didn’t do your homework at all.)

How big is your agency? (Again, this is online and you should already know this before you even sent your query.)

How long have you been in business? (Seriously. Homework. You did it, right?)

Now before you get the call, it’s important to have some idea of what your ideal answers would be. (I didn’t include mine in this list because I didn’t think that would be super helpful to you.) For example, when I ask an agent what her strong suit is, I should have an idea of what kind of agent I’m looking for. A hand holder? A negotiation shark? An editing agent? A business agent who can pitch, pitch, pitch? If I don’t already have a sense of what I’m hoping for, any one of those answers will sound just as good as any other, and I’m not any closer to finding my ideal agent.

Also keep in mind that you don’t have to go over all of these questions. (It’s a hefty list. You probably shouldn’t.) See where the conversation takes you! Have fun, be your charming self. By the end of the conversation, both of you should be happy and confident. And feel free to ask for a week or two to consider the offer, especially if you have other agents you’ve queried that deserve a heads up that an offer’s been made. (Don’t ask for more than three or four weeks, though. Be courteous.)

Still not sure what sorts of things you want to ask agents? Victoria Strauss pulled together an amazing resource on her website called Questions to Ask Your Prospective Literary Agent. She has links to bunches of posts on the subject from authors, agents, and literary companies. If you’d like to give the topic a bit more research, go give it a gander!

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