Discovery Bay at Low Tide

Discovery Bay at low tide- Port Hadlock WA

July 2016; 48°02’50” N, 122°49’40” W

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Background- Discovery Bay is an inlet on the Washington State coast on the Olympian Peninsula. It was named by Vancouver after his ship of the same name. It’s about a mile wide and six miles long. The S’Klallum people have lived there for ages, and then Europeans started showing up in the late 1700s. Clams and tiny, tiny crabs all over the place. The neighbors gave us a bunch of crab for dinner because they had too much. (Not sure how that’s possible, but I didn’t protest.)

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Tastes- peach crepes recently eaten for breakfast;

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Smells- kelp; sea brine; wet sand and dirt and plants;

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Feels- gritty sand between toes, sharp bits of seashells in bottoms of feet; air damp and thick from recent rain; cool of the morning; slight breeze blowing in from the sea;

Sounds- water lapping as the tide starts back in, surprisingly loud; heron squawking; a pair of dogs barking further down the beach;

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Sights- dark wooded hills on the far side of bay; pale gold sand lining the water; water itself is dark, the crests flashing white as they catch the sunlight; sky a bright clear blue, cloudless, the blue richer directly overhead than at the horizons; high tide is marked in the pale sand by lines of kelp, larger litter (bits of wood, shells, etc), and sticks, occasional logs; beach houses line the border between the sand and the woods, marking the beginning of a sharp incline; some houses are small, one-room things, others much larger and more ornate; many sets of stairs climb the hill between the houses, most either varnished or painted white; a few docks stretch out into the water from the shore, while a single square dock floats free a stone’s throw from the edge at low tide; a pair of sailboats are anchored in deeper water, their sails stowed, a few brightly colored kayaks tied up at their sides;

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